Tagged: “FIV”

Your Cat and Feline Aids (FIV)

Your Cat and Feline Aids (FIV)

Feline AIDs is a potentially fatal disease that interferes with the immune system caused by infection with Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV).  Cats with FIV often remain healthy for years but as the disease progresses symptoms such as weight loss, infections, poor coat may occur.

Prevalence in New Zealand is unknown but there are many areas around the Nelson region with infected cats.  Cats are mostly infected by bites from other infected cats, therefore those cats which fight regularly are more likely to be infected.

Vaccination for FIV can be started at any time and is the best way to prevent the disease.  3 vaccines, 3 weeks apart are needed initially, after that time annual vaccination is recommended.  If your cat is over 6 months old a blood test will be required prior to vaccination to ensure they are uninfected.

If you wish to vaccinate your cat for FIV or you want more information please contact us or discuss with your vet in consult.

Vaccinating your Cat

Vaccinating your Cat

Vaccinating your Cat

Your kitten should have received its first vaccination together with a physical check up at 6-8 weeks of age, however this can be done at any time.   This may have been done prior to the cat being re-homed and you would have received a vaccination certificate as proof of this.

A booster is required 3-4 weeks later, at approximately 10-11 weeks with the final booster at 14-16 weeks.   Full immune protection cannot be relied upon until after this final booster. Your cat will then need a booster a year later, going on to 2 yearly vaccinations.

The major diseases we vaccinate against include Feline Panleukopaenia Virus, Feline Herpes Virus, and Feline Calicivirus.

Feline Panleukopaenia is a very serious disease causing severe vomiting, diarrhoea, and dehydration. It is often fatal in unvaccinated kittens and young cats, despite intensive veterinary care and therapy.

Upper respiratory disease is a common contagious disease resulting in sneezing, weepy eyes, loss of appetite and lethargy. Herpes virus and Calicivirus are the most common agents involved.

A further vaccination against Feline Aids (FIV) is an optional addition.   FIV is a immune disease predominantly spread by bites from other infected cats.   We strongly recommend cats be covered against this fatal disease.  There is an initial course of three vaccines given 3 weeks apart, then annual boosters are required.